‘Horrors and Housekeeping’: Ellen Wood and the Modern Melodrama

When a woman suspects her husband of having an affair with a former flame, who is now his partner in a murder investigation, she has an affair of her own – with the murderer. The above description could easily pass as a pitch for a made-for-TV thriller, but it is the plot of Ellen Wood’s most famous novel, East Lynne (1861). I have recently been reading some of Wood’s lesser-known novels, such as St. Martin’s Eve (1866), Anne Hereford (1868),

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Amy Milne-Smith, On the trail of madness: (Micro) media panics in the Victorian press

 Amy Milne-Smith is Associate Professor of History at Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada. She is the author of London Clubland: A Cultural History of Gender and Class in Late-Victorian Britain (2011) and several articles on the history of elite masculinity. Her current research focuses on representations and understandings of men’s mental illness both in public and private life. You can follow her on Twitter @AmyMilneSmith. This post accompanies Amy Milne-Smith’s Journal of Victorian Culture article, ‘Shattered Minds: Madmen on the Railways’, which can

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Jessica Cox, The Queen of Sensation

Jessica Cox is a lecturer in English at Brunel University, London.  She has research interests in Victorian popular fiction (particularly sensation fiction), the Brontёs, first-wave feminism, and neo-Victorianism.  She is the author of a short biography of Charlotte Brontё and editor of a collection of essays on Mary Elizabeth Braddon.  She is currently writing a book on the neo-sensation novel.  You can follow her on Twitter @jessjcox and email her at Jessica.cox@brunel.ac.uk.  1861 was a busy year for Isabella Beeton, with the publication of

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