Who’s afraid of the big bad parasite? ‘The Crimson Horror’ and Victorian Social Angst in BBC’s Dr Who.

Emilie Taylor-Brown (University of Warwick) A couple of week’s ago Dr. Who saw a very Victorian antagonist (first aired in the UK on Saturday 4th May 2013). One might think that an alien parasite is a rather unlikely denizen of 1890s Yorkshire, but in fact, Mark Gatniss (the episode writer) has hit on a very nineteenth-century anxiety. Past JVC posts, such as Doctor Who-ing the Victorians and Scrooge in Space; Updating A Christmas Carol for the Twenty-First Century and Beyond,

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The Stones of Venice Discussion Group

In the run up to the BAVS/NAVSA/AVSA Global and the Local conference (3-6 June), the Journal of Victorian Culture Online has organised a short online reading group of John Ruskin’s Stones of Venice. The reading will extend over three weeks and each week will focus on a different extract. Extract One: ‘The Throne’ (Friday 11th May- concluding Friday 18th May) led by Samantha Briggs (University of Exeter) Extract Two: ‘Modern Education’ (Friday 18th May- concluding 25th May) led by Jonathan Memel (University

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How do you use academic journals and social media?

Lucinda Matthews-Jones and Helen Rogers are writing a paper called ‘Doing Things Differently: Writing, Academic Journals and Social Media in the Online World’. Notwithstanding our title, we want to start by examining how our people currently access and engage with print and digital media. We would like to know about your experience and views, whether or not you regularly read journals, visit academic blogs and websites, tweet or use Facebook. We aim to map what our community is doing now, rather than what we ought

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Poor Women and Elite Men

Victorian Women, Unwed Mothers and the London Foundling Hospital, by Jessica A. Sheetz-Nguyen, London: Continuum, 2012, xii + 258 pp. (softcover), ISBN 978 1 441 1 4112 5 Elizabeth M., a waitress in a vegetarian restaurant, sought help from the London Foundling Hospital in 1891.  She had met a respectably employed man, Daniel B., a foreman in the office of a dairy company, and the two began courting.  They decided to marry and engaged in sexual intercourse.  She became pregnant

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Avoiding those Madding Crowds: Date Night with Thomas Hardy

Ryan D. Fong Kalamazoo College For most of our readership across the United States and in the UK, April is proving to be a very cruel month indeed—with severe weather patterns and cold fronts marching across the North America and Atlantic. In these frigid days and dank nights, in which we grow ever wearier of these lingering and intemperate climes, what is a good Victorianist to do? The options would seem (at least to this Victorianist) to either sink into

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Celebrity Circulation I: Dickens in Photographs

By Susan Cook (Southern New Hampshire University, Manchester, NH) As a photographic image, Charles Dickens circulated far and wide.  The man was photographed in excess of 120 times during his life [1], and was among all Victorians, as Joss Marsh recently put it, “the most photographically famous person in Britain outside the royal family” [2].  Ironically, however, Dickens disliked having his photographic image taken.  Not only was he concerned that these images gave viewers a lie—a false sense of possessing

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Online Reading Group on John Ruskin’s ‘Stones of Venice’

In the run up to the BAVS/NAVSA/AVSA Global and the Local conference (3-6 June), Journal of Victorian Culture Online is planning an online reading group on John Ruskin’s Stones of Venice. The reading will extend over five weeks (22 April -27 May) and each week will focus on a different extract. We are looking for volunteers to select a chapter for discussion from any of the 3 volumes and to spark off the online discussion for that week. Each volunteer

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Amanda Paxton, ‘Husbands and Wives: Nineteenth-Century Contours of Power’

By Amanda Paxton One of the most rewarding opportunities I had while researching my doctoral dissertation was working with the manuscripts of the clergyman, novelist, and social reformer Charles Kingsley in the British Library, particularly the uncompleted prose text “Elizabeth of Hungary.” Begun in 1842 but never completed, the breathtaking oversize volume was intended to provide a retelling of the life of St. Elizabeth of Hungary, whose biography served as the subject of Kingsley’s later verse closet drama, The Saint’s

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The delights of a tipsy hedgehog

Jessica Hindes Trawling through recipes for the JVC Bake Off, my eye was caught by a mysterious recipe in the Lady’s Own Cookery Book reading simply ‘Hedgehog’. As a long-time connoisseur of the hedgehog cake (my Mum baked one for my first birthday party in 1986), the prospect of a Victorian variant on this much-loved dessert was profoundly appealing. Unfortunately, the Lady’s Own recipe was not. Instructions for a kind of eggy, almondy paste, cooked on the stove-top until ‘stiff

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