Georgina Grant, ‘The Fair Toxophilites’: Women and Archery

Georgina is a Curatorial Officer for the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust, based at Blists Hill Victorian Town. She has the responsibility of maintaining, developing and delivering the interpretation of the 52 acre site. Her role is varied, ranging from researching the history of canal vessels to installing Quaker costume displays and giving talks on a traditional Victorian Christmas. Follow Georgina @GeorgyGrant ‘Much might be said why archery, as a lawn game, should be preferred to croquet by ladies…’ The Witchery

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Roller Derby’s Victorian Prehistory

By Susan Cook (Southern New Hampshire University, Manchester, NH) Roller derby was not a Victorian sport. But it should have been. Today roller skating is typically thought of as a twentieth-century fad, but historians trace its origins back to the eighteenth century. Although the Dutch began using roller skates in the early 1700s, the Belgian inventor Joseph Merlin made the most memorable early impression on the new sport by skating into a masquerade party in 1760 whilst playing the violin.

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Victorian Football: Real and Imagined

Dr. Matthew L. McDowell (University of Glasgow) 2013 marks two major anniversaries in British and world football: the 150th of the Football Association’s (FA) foundation, and the 140th of the formation of the Scottish Football Association (SFA). While the celebration of these seemingly great milestones is muted throughout the British commentariat, taking stock continues well outside the boundaries of official commemoration, and mostly through rose-tinted goggles. Observer columnist Nick Cohen recently lamented the ‘cynical’ and ‘selfish’ nature of modern football.

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