Jessica Cox, The Madwoman in the Third Storey

Jessica Cox read Wuthering Heights at the age of sixteen, resulting in a developing obsession with all things Victorian.  This eventually led to her completing a PhD (on sensation writer Wilkie Collins) at Swansea University in 2007.  She is currently a lecturer in English at Brunel University, London.  Jessica has research interests in Victorian popular fiction (particularly sensation fiction), the Brontёs, first-wave feminism, and neo-Victorianism.  She is the author of a short biography of Charlotte Brontё, editor of a collection

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‘Rethinking the Nineteenth Century’ Conference Report

By Kirsten Harris, University of Nottingham The University of Sheffield’s one day conference ‘Rethinking the Nineteenth Century’, held on 24th August, centred on the timely question ‘what constitutes nineteenth century studies today?’.  This stimulated a thought-provoking and broad set of responses, with some papers offering rethinkings of specific texts, ideas or historical assumptions while others focused on considerations of the changing field itself. The day began with Mark Llewellyn’s interrogation of contemporary engagement with Victorian culture in his keynote paper,

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Digital Continuations of Victorian Classics

By Carrie Sickmann Han, Indiana University Charles Dickens’s novels might actually go on forever, not only as immortal works of literature, but as infinitely continuable fictions, thanks in part to tweets like the one above. It’s a familiar fact that the digital humanities supply us with new methodological tools and reading platforms, but these technologies also produce a seemingly inexhaustible, living archive of neo-Victorian fictions that reposition us as co-authors of beloved Victorian novels. Twitter isn’t only “like” a Dickens

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Jane Eyre’s ‘good-sized seed-cake’ and the JVC Bake Off Part 1

Helen Rogers (Liverpool John Moores University) This post has been written in conjunction with the JVC Bake Off . If you would like to know more then click here. If you feel inspiured to get involved after reading this post then email Lucie at l.m.matthew-jones@ljmu.ac.uk. I was ten or eleven when I was given Jane Eyre, my first ‘grown up’ novel. In those days I never gave up on a book but it took me three attempts to struggle through the gloomy

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