Events and Calls for Papers

Upcoming Victorian Studies Centre Spring Seminar Series at the University of Leicester.

These free research seminars take place at 5.15pm (GMT) on Wednesdays and will be hosted via Zoom. All are welcome – external audiences can join the seminars by registering using the EventBrite links below. For further details see: https://le.ac.uk/victorian-studies/events/spring-seminar-series

2021 Spring Seminar Series: Global Victorians

A Global History of Victorian Painting: Methods, Challenges, Implications

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CFP: VICTORIAN & EDWARDIAN INTERIORS

Université Toulouse Jean-Jaurès, France
        27-28 January 2022

Guest speakers (to be confirmed):
Claudia Kinmonth (independent cultural historian)
Charlotte Ribeyrol (Université Paris Sorbonne, VALE)
Penny Sparke (Director of the Modern Interiors Research Centre, Kingston University)

As we gradually come out of a long period of enforced global confinement which has challenged us, amongst other things, to take a ‘journey round [our] room[s]’ (Xavier de Maistre) and reconsider our assumptions about inside and outside, the 2022 SFEVE conference invites scholars to look afresh at the historical emergence, material manifestations and cultural significance of the interior in the long nineteenth century. Building on recent interdisciplinary research in material studies, architectural design theory, the Victorian architectural imaginary and the poetics, politics and phenomenology of dwelling, this conference seeks to explore the multiple facets of the interior from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the end of the Edwardian era.

Central to the concept of ‘interior’ is the imbrication of the word’s spatial, physical, emotional, mystical and political meanings. ‘Interior’ came into use in the English language in the sixteenth century to mean inside as divided from outside, but also more specifically to describe the deeper, more spiritual nature of the soul within the body. Derived from the Latin ‘intus’ (i.e. ‘within’), ‘interior’ is a comparative form, whose meaning is accentuated in the superlative ‘intimus’ (i.e. innermost, deepest, most secret, most private). From the early eighteenth century, ‘interiority’ was used to evoke inner character and individual subjectivity. But from the middle of the eighteenth century the ‘interior’ was also a geo-political term used to refer to the domestic affairs of a state and to the territory that belongs to a country. It was only at the beginning of the nineteenth century that, according to the _Oxford English Dictionary_, the ‘interior’ came to mean ‘the inside of a building or room especially in reference to the artistic effect; also a picture or representation of the inside of a building. Also, in a theatre, a “set” consisting of the inside of a building or room.’

Thus, as Charles Rice notes, the nineteenth-century interior is inherently double, both a physical three-dimensional space and at the same time an image—a painting, print, theatrical backdrop—which can ‘be imagined and dreamed, and inhabited as such’ (2). While nineteenth-century conceptualizations of the interior were clearly linked to important questions of public health, territorial expansion, historical knowledge and the exploration of the body, subjectivity and the unconscious, the Victorians thus foregrounded the idea of the interior’s deliberate and artful constructedness. In some of the commemorative colour prints of colonial interiors on display at the Crystal Palace in 1851, for example, the theatricality of the interior is regularly emphasized through the presence of visitors/spectators peering through drawn curtains.

In fact, the notion of ‘interior decoration’, appearing for the first time in Thomas Hope’s 1807 Household Furniture and Interior Decoration —and popularized through countless Victorian and Edwardian periodicals and manuals—firmly articulated the idea of the interior through decor. This new preoccupation led to the founding in 1837 of the London School of Design, rebranded in 1853 as the Museum of Ornamental Art (today known as the Victoria & Albert Museum). The interior became understood as the creation of a scenography, complete with adornments and furnishings which served to soften, conceal or transform—however fleetingly—the architectural structure, in order to make it livable, hospitable and culturally legible. In Vlad Ionescu’s words, the interior can thus be seen as the ‘moment when a building receives its cultural significance [and] “speaks” to its users’ (2). Such a dynamic, dialogic, relational approach to the interior is particularly striking in the nineteenth-century print culture through which a great variety of interiors were depicted and shaped. The idea of the interior as relational is also poignantly captured in numerous works of literature. One memorable example (among many) can be found in Charles Dickens’ Hard Times , in the following exchange between Louisa and her dying mother: “‘Are you in pain, dear mother?’ ‘I think there’s a pain somewhere in the room,’ said Mrs. Gradgrind, ‘but I couldn’t positively say that I have got it.’” (chap. 9)

If, as Walter Benjamin famously put it in the 1930s, ‘[t]he nineteenth century, like no other century, was addicted to dwelling,’ this conference, however, will attempt to qualify and/or revise Benjamin’s conceptualization of the Victorian interior as ‘the étui of the private individual’ (9), as well as his rather sinister notion that the nineteenth century encased the person ‘so deeply in the dwelling’s interior that one might be reminded of the inside of a compass case, where the instrument with all its accessories lies embedded in deep, usually violet folds of velvet’ (220). Instead, we wish to broaden the scope of attention to Victorian and Edwardian interiors not limited to the bourgeois, domestic and urban. Participants are therefore encouraged to consider a diverse array of interiors. Proposals may for example consider:

*interiors which enabled a renewed critical engagement with the exterior rather than an anti-historical retreat from the world
*complex or problematic interiors (such as public interiors, utopian/political/militant interiors, transparent interiors, gendered interiors, queer interiors, working-class interiors, cosmopolitan interiors, colonial interiors, natural interiors, etc.)
*the aesthetic experiences, cultural practices, or socio-economic transformations made possible through the decorating/designing of interior spaces/rooms
*how interiors and interiorities were staged, mediated and/or marketed, and the role played by new visual technologies (stereoscope, photography, museum displays etc.)
*how the interior was represented across political, scientific, medical and architectural discourses
*the poetics, aesthetics, politics and economics of the interior in literature, art, magazines, book design and material culture
*the articulation between interiors and subjectivity, objects and people, the material and the immaterial
*various forms of dwelling, as well as the allied notions of ‘home’, homelessness and homesickness
*issues of preservation, renovation and re-use of nineteenth-century interiors
*contemporary re-interpretations of the nineteenth-century interior in neo-Victorian fiction, heritage cinema, etc.

Please send a 300-500-word abstract (for a 20-minute presentation followed by 10 minutes of question/discussion) with a short bio-bibliography to Catherine Delyfer AND Amélie Dochy.

Deadline for submissions: 10 July 2021
Notification of acceptance: 30 July 2021

Publication: a selection of peer-reviewed articles will be published in a special issue of Cahiers Victoriens et Edouardiens

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The Gaskell Journal

Joan Leach Memorial

Graduate Student Essay Prize 2022

Deadline for submissions: 1 February 2022

The Gaskell Journal runs a biennial Graduate Student Essay Prize in honour of Joan Leach MBE, founder of the Gaskell Society. The winning essay will be published in the Gaskell Journal (with revisions as appropriate), and its author will receive £200 from the Gaskell Society, and a complimentary copy of the Journal.

The essay competition is open to all graduate students currently registered for an MA or PhD. Entries must offer an original contribution to the field of Gaskell studies, whether a reading of her works in relation to Victorian cultural, religious, aesthetic and scientific contexts, or innovative close readings enlightened by critical theory, or a comparative study connecting Gaskell’s with another author’s work. Essays will be shortlisted by the Gaskell Journal Editorial Board, with the final winner being chosen by our guest judge, Professor Kate Flint of the University of Southern California (author of works including The Woman Reader 1837-1914The Victorians and the Visual ImaginationThe Transatlantic IndianFlash! Photography, Writing and Surprising Illumination, and monographs on both Gaskell and Dickens).

Essays should be 6000-7000 words, and not under consideration for publication elsewhere. All shortlisted submissions will be considered for potential publication in the Gaskell Journal. Please see the Gaskell Journal website for submission details and style guide: www.gaskelljournal.co.uk. Please direct any queries to the Editor, Dr Rebecca Styler: rstyler@lincoln.ac.uk

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Decoding Dickens: Contexts, Inspirations, Approaches – 21 May 2021, 2pm-6.40pm (BST)

An online networking symposium that introduces the ‘savage stenographic mystery’ of Dickens’s shorthand and the challenges of deciphering unusual scripts

Organisers: Dr Claire Wood (University of Leicester) and Professor Hugo Bowles (University of Foggia)

Join us on 21 May to explore Charles Dickens’s mysterious shorthand writing and its place within a little-known stenographic culture.

  • Learn about the history of shorthand from the seventeenth century through to the nineteenth, as well as Dickens’s struggles to master Gurney’sBrachygraphy.
  • Try your hand at decoding Dickens’s shorthand (optional pre-symposium task).
  • Hear from curators about fascinating shorthand manuscripts in their collections.
  • Engage with a range of inspirational digital humanities projects through case studies presented by ‘Dickens Code’ network members.
  • Reflect upon the challenges of decoding one of Dickens’s undeciphered shorthand scripts and hear about approaches rooted in Informatics and Forensic Linguistics.
  • Contribute to conversations about how we can involve people in the decoding process – and ultimately crack the ‘Dickens Code’!

This free event is open to all with an interest in Dickens, stenography, word puzzles, and digital humanities. It is part of the AHRC-funded ‘Dickens Code’ project. To book your free place, please visit: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/decoding-dickens-contexts-inspirations-approaches-tickets-152476510347

The full programme can be found here: https://le.ac.uk/dickens-code/events

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If you would like to add an event to this list, please contact the Online Editor, Elly McCausland, at eleanor.mccausland@ilos.uio.no