JVC

Kristin Hussey, Looking for the Victorian Eye in London’s Medical Museums

Kristin Hussey (kristin.hussey@qmul.ac.uk) is a PhD researcher int he School of Geography at Queen Mary University of London. Her doctoral research focuses on the influence of the British Empire on the development of medical practice and culture in late nineteenth century London.  “It has been designated “the queen of the senses,” “the index of the mind,” “the window of the soul;” nay, it has even been esteemed “in itself a soul;” and ” He who spake as never man spake”

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Billie-Gina Thomason, Female Husband or the Man-Woman of Manchester? Review of Mister Stokes’s premier at the LGBT History Festival Launch

Billie-Gina Thomason is currently undertaking an MRes in Modern History in Liverpool John Moores University and is beginning the historicisation of trans* identity. Billie-Gina’s research focusses on nineteenth century female husbands. By using newspapers her interests lie in how female cross-dressers lived in their communities despite living in a time of such gender and sexual rigidity. Mister Stokes: The Man-Woman of Manchester was written by Abi Hynes. The play was directed by Helen Parry and produced by Pagelight Productions and

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Rachel Carroll, “Sugar’s The Past”: Black British History in ITV’s Jericho (2016)

Rachel Carroll is Reader in English at Teesside University.  She is the author of Rereading Heterosexuality: Feminism, Queer Theory and Contemporary Fiction (2012) and editor of Adaptation in Contemporary Culture: Textual Infidelities (2009) and (with Adam Hansen) Litpop: Writing and Popular Music (2014).  Her essays on black Britain and literary adaptation have been published in Andrea Levy: Contemporary Critical Perspectives (2014) and Adaptation (2015).   In the early months of 2016 American audiences from Washington to New York were able

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Douglas Small, Cream and Cocaine: Hallucination, Obsession, and Sexuality in Victorian Cocaine Addiction

This post accompanies Douglas Small’s Journal of Victorian article ‘Masters of Healing: Cocaine and the Ideal of the Victorian Medical Man’ which can be downloaded here. Painless Surgery Cocaine occupied something of a contradictory position in the late-Victorian cultural imagination. Albert Niemann had isolated the cocaine alkaloid from raw coca leaves as early as 1860, but it was not until 1884 that cocaine truly entered the popular consciousness. In September of that year, a Viennese Ophthalmologist (and friend of Sigmund

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Mike Huggins, ‘Exploring the Backstage of Victorian Civilized Respectability: A Reply to Andersson”

Mike Huggins  is Emeritus Professor of Cultural History at the University of Cumbria and has published widely on the histories of sport, leisure and education. He is currently writing a cultural history of horse racing and society in Britain 1664-1815. His website can be found here. This post responds to Peter K. Andersson’s Journal of Victorian Culture article ‘How Civilised were the Victorians’. This article can be downloaded here. Andersson’s argument that scholars have devoted disproportionate attention to the disciplining

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Susie Steinbach, Who owns the Victorians?: A Response to Peter K. Andersson’s ‘How Civilised Were the Victorians?’

Susie Steinbach is a professor of history at Hamline University in Saint Paul, Minnesota currently living in York, England. Her work focuses on gender, performance, and the law during the Victorian period. The second edition of her textbook, Understanding the Victorians: Politics, Culture, and Society in Nineteenth-century Britain will be published by Routledge later this year. In his essay “How Civilized Were the Victorians?” Peter K. Andersson challenges scholars of the Victorian period to work differently and better. Specifically, he

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Maho Sakoda, Liberty and Japonism

Maho Sakoda is a PhD candidate at the University of Sussex in Brighton. Her thesis explores the relationship between literature and art in the nineteenth century. It especially focuses on works by George Eliot in relation to contemporary artists and thinkers such as by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Edward Burne-Jones, Walter Pater, Simeon Solomon and Julia Margaret Cameron. The shop floors of the world famous department store, Liberty at Regent street in London, are crowded with shoppers and tourists who are

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Alyson Hunt, Not to Be Sniffed At: The Handkerchief in Victorian Crime Fiction

Alyson Hunt is a PhD candidate in the English Department at Canterbury Christ Church University, Kent.  Her current research explores the concept of Victorian crime short fiction as a vehicle for social anxieties and considers how dress and clothing illuminates and encrypts these anxieties. She also works as a Research Associate for the International Centre for Victorian Women Writers. The humble handkerchief has played at best a marginal role within Victorian society. Peeping disconsolately from a gentleman’s top pocket, tucked

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Patricia Zakreski, Making a Black Ball Gown: Fashion and Social Change in the 1870s

Patricia Zakreski is Lecturer in Victorian Literature and Culture at the University of Exeter. She is the author of Representing Female Artistic Labour, 1848–1890: Refining Work for the Middle-Class Woman (Ashgate, Farnham, 2006). She is co-editor of ‘What is a Woman to Do?’ A Reader on Women, Work and Art, c. 1830–1890 (Peter Lang, Oxford, 2011) and Crafting the Woman Professional in the Long Nineteenth Century: Artistry and Industry in Britain (Ashgate, Farnham, 2013). Her current project includes articles and

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DIGITAL FORUM: ‘The Future of Academic Journals’ (21:1)

‘The Future of Academic Journals’ edited by Zoe Alker, Christopher Donaldson and James Mussell. This Digital Forum offers perspectives on the opportunities and challenges presented by the use of digital technologies in academic publishing, networking and communication. It features position papers from three participants in the ‘Victorian Studies Journals: Coming of Age’ roundtable that convened at BAVS 2015: Lucinda Matthews-Jones, James Mussell and Helen Rogers. Collectively, these three scholars offer incisive reflections on the ways that scholars and publishers have

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