JVC

Susan E. Cook: Deep Reading the Victorians (Part 2 of 3)

In Part 1 of this post I described Nicholas Carr’s thesis about the cognitive differences between digital and print reading, and suggested that it would be worth troubling the category of “print reading” a bit further by considering the ways print has changed over time.  Below I detail the first part of my print reading experiment. For my own nineteenth-century reading experiment text I selected Mrs. Henry Wood’s East Lynne.  I selected it because I had never read it before

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Susan E. Cook: Deep Reading the Victorians (Part 1 of 3)

Susan E. Cook, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of English Southern New Hampshire University  What is it like to read in the 21st century?  How does technology impact our reading practices?  How does the shift from print to digital impact the way we read—and how does the shift from older printing techniques to contemporary ones also impact our reading? In his 2010 book The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains, science and technology writer Nicholas Carr employs cultural critique

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Guy Woolnough – Blood Sports in Victorian Cumbria

Guy Woolnough – Keele University  This post accompanies Guy Woolnough’s JVC article ‘Blood Sports in Victorian Cumbria: Policing Cultural Change’, which can be downloaded here. Cumbria is different and special. This is an opinion that most present-day visitors today will share with the great and good of the 19th century: the Wordsworths, John Ruskin, Harriet Martineau, Matthew Arnold, Beatrix Potter and many more expressed their appreciation of Cumbria’s uniqueness. Sport is just one area of culture where Cumbria has long differed

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Vicky Holmes – Lodger in the Bedroom

Vicky Holmes – University of Essex This post accompanies Vicky Holmes JVC 2014 article ‘Accommodating the Lodger: The Domestic Arrangements of Lodgers in Working-Class Dwellings in a Victorian Provincial Town’, which can be downloaded here. In my article, ‘Accommodating the Lodger: The Domestic Arrangements of Lodgers in Working-Class Dwellings in a Victorian Provincial Town’, I attempt to locate the lodger and reappraise our understanding of their position in working-class homes, including their place in the family’s bedroom.Despite the idea that the

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Peter Stoneley – ‘Looking at the Others’: Oscar Wilde and the Reading Goal Archive

Oscar Wilde’s two-year imprisonment.  in solitary confinement caused him profound moral, emotional and physical shock.  He nonetheless claimed to have been saved by his fellow prisoners.  He told André Gide that for the first six months in gaol, he was ‘terribly unhappy’, and had wanted to kill himself.  What prevented him was ‘looking at the others ’.  Seeing them, and seeing that they were as unhappy as he was, made him feel pity, and it was this that broke his

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Lara Rutherford-Morrison – A Book to Sink One’s Teeth Into: Part Two

Lara Rutherford-Morrison – University of California, Santa Barbara Part Two: Bringing the Body into the Digital Book. You can read part two here. When people talk about the downsides of e-books, they often complain that e-books lack a connection between reader and body—without the physical texture, weight, and smell of the book and its pages, the e-book can seem (forgive the pun) rather bloodless. Interactive e-book apps, like PadWorx’s Dracula: The Official Stoker Family Edition (2010), attempt to draw the body back into

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Lara Rutherford-Morrison – A Book to Sink One’s Teeth Into: Part One

Lara Rutherford-Morrison-University of California, Santa Barbara Part One: Re-Vamping Dracula as an Interactive E-Book Since the iPad first arrived on the scene in 2010, a variety of e-book apps have attempted to take advantage of the uniquely interactive possibilities of the tablet computer. Many of these apps are designed for educational purposes. For example, Cambridge’s Shakespeare apps and Touch Press’s edition of Eliot’s The Wasteland include supplementary materials like audio-recordings of the texts, critical commentary, performance videos, and images—all aimed at

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Tosh Warwick – Cities Revisited: Heritage, History and Regeneration of the ‘Infant Hercules’

Tosh Warwick (Tees Transporter Bridge / University of Huddersfield) In 1862 Middlesbrough was heralded by future Liberal Prime Minister William Gladstone as a ‘remarkable place, the youngest child of England’s enterprise…an infant Hercules’.[i]  In under a century the town expanded from a tiny hamlet of only 25 inhabitants in 1801 to one exceeding 90,000 by 1901 and approaching 140,000 thirty years later, becoming one of the manufacturing centres of Britain and dubbed ‘Ironopolis’.   Such is Middlesbrough’s importance in Victorian urban

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The Aesthetic Experience across Three Centuries

Translating Louise Rosenblatt’s PhD (1931) on ‘Art for Art’s Sake’ Richard Whitney Richard Whitney’s current research is on the work of Louise Rosenblatt and the poet H.D., and looks at the humanistic nature of literary experience and those who pursue this as a form of wisdom-knowledge inquiry. He has presented papers on Rosenblatt and Ottoline Morrell, and has a forthcoming publication on Ottoline’s presence in Virginia Woolf’s The Voyage Out. In 2014 he was awarded an AHRC Doctoral Training Partnership

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Barbara Barrow, ‘Bodies, Politic and Social: Language-Origins Controversies in Thomas Carlyle’s The French Revolution’

Barbara Barrow is Assistant Professor of British Literature at Point Park University. She will receive her Ph.D. in English Literature from Washington University in St. Louis in August 2014. Her research focuses the interchange between liberalism and the science of language in Victorian literature and culture. Yous can find her academia profile here. This post accompanies Barbara Burrow’s JVC 2014 article ‘Speaking the Social Body: Language-Origins and Thomas Carlyle’s The French Revolution’, which can be downloaded here. Images of bodies

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